'Server' Category

Admin :: New Home, New Name

This site, formerly known as ‘zebpedersen.co.uk’, has undertaken its third official server move.  Since the first post on Sept. 15th, 2010, the site has inhabited Uncle Meat – an HP DL380 G3 which was loud as hell,  Lumpy Gravy – a homebuilt PC which was much more civilised, and most recently Phaze III – a rented VPS on a 200 meg pipe (up from the 512k home broadband the original machines ran on).

That server grew to be slow as hell, and I’m serving more professional content now which means uptime is important, and the old box wasn’t cutting it, and was expensive. And thus we arrive at today – the old site, reborn on a new, faster, more reliable, cheaper server (named Thing-Fish), and with a new domain to boot. The original zebpedersen.co.uk will soon redirect to the new zebpedersen.com, my portfolio site, so update bookmarks etc… to the somewhat new zeblog.co.

DIY Linux Transmission Server

 

One of my favourite things about Linux is its ability to transform a formerly useless elderly computer into something really useful indeed. This is the first in a series of posts covering some great projects to breathe new life into old machines using Linux.

What’s the Project?

BitTorrent is a fantastically useful distribution mechanism – when downloading updated Linux distro ISOs, it regularly exceeds the speeds available through centralised (HTTP/FTP) download repositories, and the sharing of bandwidth and ease of distribution are a great fit for online communities and fan groups (Zappateers, for example). Unfortunately, BitTorrent tends to be a total disk I/O hog, constantly reading and writing tiny chunks of file all over your disk. This causes big slowdowns for all other running programs which need access to your hard disk, not to mention the stress it puts on the drive itself.

We’re going to use an old computer, GNU/Linux and the Transmission BitTorrent client to offload this resource-intensive process to a networked machine, freeing up your main machine to get on with business unfettered. Sacrificing convenience, however, is not an option. Therefore, we’re going to implement the following convenience features:

  • Administering the client through a web browser
  • Sharing content over the local network
  • Creating a zero-setup process for starting new transfers

(more…)

Solving the MBProgressHud _WebTryThreadLock Error

MBProgressHud is a really nice bit of plug in code to add fancy status and loading notifications to your iOS app quickly and easily. It looks great! Unfortunately, there’s an irritating error which cost me some time this morning, and hopefully I can save anyone else in the same position some trouble.

The error:

bool _WebTryThreadLock(bool), 0x7b9b5500: Tried to obtain the web lock from a thread other than the main thread or the web thread. This may be a result of calling to UIKit from a secondary thread. Crashing now...

This appears when a method which needs to update a UI component is called directly by the MBProgressHUD object.

The most basic usage of MBProgressHUD is thus:

HUD = [[MBProgressHUD alloc] initWithView:self.view];
[self.view addSubview:HUD];
HUD.delegate = self;
[HUD showWhileExecuting:@selector(fetchNewData) onTarget:self withObject:nil animated:YES];

In which ‘fetchNewData’ is the method which is executed while the progress HUD is on display.

Using this technique, fetchNewData will be called on a secondary thread, which causes the crash error we’ve already experienced. UIKit, which handles all the user interface business, should only be running on the main thread, so when the secondary thread makes a move on a particular UI element, its going to throw the ‘web lock from a thread…’ error. (It should be noticed that you can update some UI components using the standard MBProgressHUD setup detailed above, but in most cases you’ll get the error.)

In the case of this example, ‘fetchNewData’ updates part of the UI, so it needs to be called on the main thread. The quick and dirty workaround I used to force it to execute where I wanted it to was to create an intermediary method which can be called by MBProgressHUD as normal but in turn calls ‘fetchNewData’ specifically on the main thread.

You could, for example, call this method ‘performFetchOnMainThread’:

-(void) performFetchOnMainThread    {
[self performSelectorOnMainThread:@selector(fetchNewData) withObject:nil waitUntilDone:YES];
}

Instead of directly calling ‘fetchNewData’ from MBProgressHUD, use it to execute ‘performFetchOnMainThread’, which uses the ‘performSelectorOnMainThread’ method to force ‘fetchNewData’ to be executed on the main thread.

This isn’t the most efficient or beautiful way to accomplish this, but it works, so if you’re getting a ‘web lock from a thread…’ error and you need to make sure your code is executed on the main thread, you can use this technique to get the job done quickly.

Schedule WordPress Backups Using Cron

I was contacted a couple of days back by a reader who wanted to add my super simple WordPress backup program to Cron, the Unix task scheduler, to create automated regular snapshots of his site. Backing up my website using the program is something I normally do by hand as part of my general system maintenance routine, but the program is easily incorporated in to Cron to run on a timer. Completely by coincidence, I suffered a WordPress plugin failure within a couple of days of creating the Cron job, and thanks to my now daily backups I was able to restore from a 10 hour old snapshot with the minimum of fuss. (more…)

Colorshare – Available in the App Store

Hot off the presses and approved by Apple mere moments ago, colorshare will become available in regional iPhone App Stores the world over over the next 48 hours or so.

Colorshare is a simple utility which allows you to quickly design a palette of colours on your iPhone or iPod Touch and with the tap of a button share it with the web using the unique palette ID number, which you can punch right into the colorshareapp.com homepage.

Once you’ve entered the ID of the palette you want to work with, it will appear on screen alone with a full breakdown of each colour in RGB, hexadecimal and CMYK.

Colorshare is completely free, and you can grab it from the App Store by following this link.

Mac OS X 10.7 Lion DOES Ship With X11

And I’ve got the eyes to prove it. There seems to be some concern online that Lion ‘ships’ (can we even say that any more?) without X11. Well, one of the first things I’ve checked out on my retail copy of Lion is X11, which is present as ever.

Open a Terminal window, type ‘xeyes’ at the prompt and you’ll see X11 staring right back at you.

This installed by default on my MacBook Pro, but if you find it missing from your installation you can install it from the ‘Packages’ folder on the Lion install USB key/DMG.

RAM Disk vs Hard Disk

A couple of days ago I posted a small program that I created to facilitate easy creation and management of RAM disks on a Linux system. At the time, I missed a prime opportunity to do some benchmarking:

Using a RAM disk, you gain a working folder with speed way far in excess of any hard disk or even solid state drive

Just how ‘way far in excess’ is the speed of a RAM disk than a traditional hard drive? Way far indeed, and here comes the proof:

(more…)

Super Simple Linux RAM Disk Manager – rdmanage

I’m currently developing a piece of server software which needs to be able to create, modify, serve up and dispose of many temporary files many times every second. Because a great number of I/O operations will be occurring, the program requires very rapid disk access – ideally, it would run on a RAID array or a solid-state disk. Because the server I’m using doesn’t have either, I’m using RAM disks as a substitute.

RAM disks take a portion of your system RAM memory and make it available for storage by mounting it in your file system. Using a RAM disk, you gain a working folder with speed way far in excess of any hard disk or even solid state drive. The usual rules of RAM apply – this is volatile memory, so anything stored on a RAM disk will be erased when the power is cut – but it’s perfect for temporary file storage.

I’ve written a very simple program for Linux called ‘rdmanage’ to help create and manage RAM disks easily at the command line.

Operation:

There are three modes of operation for this program – create a new RAM disk, create a RAM disk from an existing folder, and remove existing RAM disk. As promised, the program is very simple to operate:

To create a RAM Disk:

$ ./rdmanage create [size in mb]

For example, to create a 100MB RAM disk:

$ ./rdmanage create 100

To create RAM Disk from an existing folder:

$ ./rdmanage from /path/to/folder

For example, to create a RAM disk from the folder ‘/home/randymarsh/sim’:

$ ./rdmanage from /home/randymarsh/sim

To remove an existing RAM Disk:

$ ./rdmanage remove

Notes:

– When using the ‘from folder’ mode, the maximum size of the folder is 512MB

– You will need root permissions to mount the RAM drive

– The ‘remove’ mode will commit the state of the RAM drive to disk in a folder called ‘ramdisk.contents’

– All operations will occur within the current working directory (i.e. the folder you’re presently in). To check which folder you’re in, type ‘pwd’ at the command prompt.

– Depending on how you download the program, you might have to set the file as executable:

$ chmod +x rdmanage

– If you want to check the status of your drive, it will be listed when you use the ‘df’ command

– For program help, type:

$ ./rdmanage help

Download

You can download the program by right-clicking here and selecting ‘Save As’/’Save Target As’, or if you would prefer to download straight to your Linux machine from the command line, use wget:

$ wget http://zebpedersen.co.uk/python/rdmanage

Hopefully this program can save you a bit of time creating and managing your RAM disks. Enjoy!

Super Simple WordPress Backup Program

Whatever you do with your computer, it’s absolutely vital to back up your data. Never is this more true than when you’re administering a website, where creating backups should be a well organised and regular procedure.

This site is no exception to that rule, so to help me out with my daily backups I’ve written a small program in the Python programming language which automates the process of archiving daily snapshots of my site. For peace of mind, I still prefer to launch and organise backups myself rather than use completely automatic solutions; this program helps make that process much quicker.

Download

You can download the program by right-clicking here and pressing ‘Save As’/’Save Target As’.

If you want to download straight to your Linux machine from the command line, use wget:

$ wget http://zebpedersen.co.uk/python/wordpressbackup

The program is designed to run under Linux, but theoretically it will work on any Unix system (Mac OS X, Solaris etc…) with Python installed.

Operation

All you need to feed the program is the path to your WordPress installation (the directory containing your wp-****.php files). The database login credentials are borrowed from WordPress, and the backup is placed in a date-stamped folder for easy archiving.

Each backup contains a dump of your MySQL database and a tarball of your installation directory – everything you need to restore your site in case of a disaster. The backup will be created in the folder from which you start the program.

To launch the program:

$ ./wordpressbackup /path/to/wordpress/installation

For example, if your site is located in the directory ‘/home/randymarsh/web’, the command would be:

$ ./wordpressbackup /home/randymarsh/web

If you need help or more information, use the help & about functions:

$ ./wordpressbackup help

$ ./wordpressbackup about

Hopefully this little script can help out anyone else like me who only trusts a backup they’ve done by hand. Enjoy!

 

Create VHD Images Using VirtualBox

Yesterday, I wrote a post offering some VHD image files of various sizes for download. However, if you’re a bit more intrepid, you might want to create some of your own.

Despite the fact that (as far as I’m aware) you can’t create VHD image files using the GUI version of Oracle’s VirtualBox software, it is possible to create them using the command line tool ‘VBoxManage’.

Here’s how:

$ VBoxManage createhd --filename 40GB_VHD.vhd --size 40000 --format VHD --variant Standard

This command is fairly self-explanatory. Options as follows:

  • createhd (create a virtual disk image)
  • –filename [filename.vhd]
  • –size [size in MB]
  • –format [specify the new file as a VHD image]
  • –variant [‘Standard’ equates to self-expanding]

VBoxManage and other VBox command line tools are installed when you load the full version of VirtualBox (available here), so there’s nothing extra you need to load on. This command works on PC, Mac and Linux. Enjoy!