Posts Tagged ‘Lion’

Unhide ~/Library in Mac OS X Lion 10.7 [Take Two]

As many people have no doubt noticed by now, Mac OS X 10.7 hides your Library folder by default in the Finder. For power users, developers and other such creatures in regular need of the Library, this means a trip to the Terminal, which seems like a step backwards (to me, at least).

There has been a hack floating around to reenable hidden folders which I detailed here, however it really goes too far, enabling the whole Unix filesystem for view in the Finder.

A more useable alternative uses the ‘chflags’ command, and can be invoked with the following:

$ chflags nohidden ~/Library

PC Keyboards in Mac OS X Lion

One of the benefits of the recent upgrade I made to Mac OS X 10.7 Lion is how consistently simple using a PC keyboard now is. The preference pane for switching the modifier keys around (using alt in place of CMD, Windows key in place of option etc…) was available in Snow Leopard and earlier versions, but compatibility with the range of PC keyboards I’ve tried with my various Macs has long been a bit patchy – even though the changes would save in System Preferences, the keys would still use the default mapping.

If you’re used to CMD being either side of the space bar, it can get pretty annoying when it isn’t there.

In earlier versions of OS X, I’ve used DoubleCommand when there’s been trouble remapping keys, however I’m pleased to report that Lion seems to have addressed some of the earlier issues with the modifier preference pane being ineffective.

I’ve tested the modifiers with a range of keyboards (including ones I’ve experienced issues with in the past) and they all seem to be altering the maps without issue.

To alter the key map:

1. Open System Preferences and select the ‘Keyboard’ preference pane

2. Click the ‘Modifier Keys’ button and switch the mapping. When you’re done, click ‘OK’ and close the preference pane.

Restore Hidden Files to OS X 10.7 Lion Finder

One step Lion takes in the direction of erasing the file system altogether is hiding the Library, System and other OS- and user-crucial directories in the Finder.

Obviously as power users we’re fully used to delving into the (already abstracted) file system of Mac OS X, and we want those folders back! Via this site, there is a Terminal command to restore access to these directories, but be warned that it comes with a caveat: by enabling access to these folders, you open up the whole filesystem including UNIX folders (etc, var…) and DS_Store files for view in the Finder.

In short, it’s way annoying, especially when browsing Linux volumes.

Irritating as having bits of the filesystem whipped away from prying eyes, I think I’m going to stick with Terminal for accessing those folders. TextWrangler can still browse them, and that’s enough for me. For those who want to see everything, and I mean everything:

$ defaults write com.apple.Finder AppleShowAllFiles YES

Mac OS X 10.7 Lion iTunes Widget Download

 

Whilst Java was actually pretty easy to load and X11 is installed by default, one thing definitely missing from Mac OS X 10.7 Lion is the iTunes widget. I use the iTunes widget all the time, so it was pretty annoying that it was not included with Lion.

I pulled the widget file from a Snow Leopard install I have on another machine and, thankfully, it works perfectly with the dashboard on Lion.

For anyone also missing the iTunes widget in Lion, you can download it here.

[Legal: I’m not the copyright holder or the original author of this file]

Install Xcode 4 on Mac OS X 10.7 Lion

Macintosh and iOS developers upgrading to Lion are in for a slice of annoyance, courtesy of Xcode 4.

Xcode was one of the first programs I installed after the Lion upgrade, but after downloading the massive (4GB+) setup file for the second time – direct from the Mac App store – I was met with an error informing me that Xcode was not compatible with Lion.

But I downloaded it straight from the Mac App Store, where all of the latest software is available, right?

Well yeah, that is correct, kinda. Unfortunately it seems that anyone who shelled out for Xcode 4 on Snow Leopard is being directed to the old version. There is a new version available on the Mac App Store, but if you’re reinstalling from your purchase history then you’re downloading the wrong thing, man.

So don’t download Xcode from your purchase history! Head over to this page and grab Xcode 4.1 instead.

Mac OS X 10.7 Lion DOES Ship With X11

And I’ve got the eyes to prove it. There seems to be some concern online that Lion ‘ships’ (can we even say that any more?) without X11. Well, one of the first things I’ve checked out on my retail copy of Lion is X11, which is present as ever.

Open a Terminal window, type ‘xeyes’ at the prompt and you’ll see X11 staring right back at you.

This installed by default on my MacBook Pro, but if you find it missing from your installation you can install it from the ‘Packages’ folder on the Lion install USB key/DMG.

Install Java for Mac OS X 10.7 Lion

Like many people out there living on the Macintosh, I’ve spent the best part of this evening backing up, installing and downloading files, all to upgrade my machines to the latest and greatest from Cupertino, CA – OS X Lion. I’ve got a pretty epic Evernote listing all the software I need to reload, but one absentee from the default install is the Java platform. As a Java dev, this is one of the first points I’ve looked to address.

Installing Java on OS X Lion is actually really easy, but for some reason starting the process is not very obvious.

Java is installed by the Software Update program, however to launch the process you’ll need to open a Terminal window and type:

$ java

Software Update will take it from there. Seems so odd, the pairing of Terminal and Software Update, probably the least and most friendly parts of the Mac OS.